Passengers Fed Up With Airlines Sky High Food And Drink Prices

Some Airlines Are Charging More Than 400% Than Supermarkets On Food And Drink

 

It seems like you cannot trust anyone nowadays. When you go on holiday abroad sometimes you expect to get ripped off by some of the shops, but you don’t expect to get ripped off while you are up in the air. However, according to passengers and travel experts, that is what is happening.

Passengers expect to pay a little more on food and drink while flying to or from their holiday destination, but what they don’t expect is to pay more than 400% than in a local supermarket. With a recent price check on items that are being sold by different airlines, and the prices that are being sold in local supermarkets, it seems that is what’s happening.

It seems that airlines and travel companies have no problem in overcharging their customers. They know they have a target audience, but passengers are now getting fed up with it. But now, it seems passengers are fighting back by either eating and drinking in the airport, or by buying products from airport shops and taking them on the aircraft.

Mr Harding travelling from East Midlands Airport told In2town Travel Magazine: “When you are travelling with the wife and two children, buying food and drink on a flight can be very expensive. We now always buy our food and drink from the airport shops.”

The father of two is not alone at his upset over the sky-high prices on airlines for food and drink. In2town Travel Magazine spoken to many parents who were shocked at the prices, with many of them feeling they were being forced to pay them to keep their children happy.

Although passengers are fed up with some passengers refusing to pay the shocking prices, airlines have no intention of changing their pricing policy, and will continue to overcharge their customers.

A source at a low-cost airline explained to In2town Travel Magazine that these prices help to keep flight prices low. He said, without selling products at inflated prices then flights to popular destinations would be more expensive.

By Mark Wilkes