Outspoken Ryanair Boss Michael O’Leary Angry Over Compensation Legal Ruling

Cheap flights airline boss Michael O’Leary cannot believe the landmark legal ruling which will force him and his company to pay passengers compensation when they have been stranded.

Ryanair Boss Michael O’Leary has claimed the legal ruling will hit passengers in the pockets as well as causing financial burden to airlines where he even claims it could force some airlines to go to the wall.

The cheap flights airline boss who has called the legal ruling stupid has said that passengers will now see an increase in air fares to cover the cost.

 

‘Ryanair Forced To Pay Passenger Compensation’

 

Michael O’Leary who became angry over the European Court of Justice Ruling feels the legal ruling will put even more pressure on airlines after the ruling has stated airlines should cover stranded customers’ food, ­accommodation, transport and communication costs, even in extraordinary circumstances.

 

The court ruling follows the claim by Ryanair passenger Denise McDonagh who was stranded in Faro, Portugal during the Icelandic ash cloud of 2010. She found herself being out of pocket when she had to pay for accommodation, meals and transport and successfully thought for £970 compensation for cheap flights airline Ryanair.

Airlines are now bracing themselves and fear the millions of passengers who were unable to get back to their home because of the ash clouds may now also seek compensation.

O’Leary fumed: “Somebody who has paid us fifty quid to travel to the Canaries, who may be stuck there for two weeks, two months, six months, will now sue the airlines.

“You will have airlines going out of business and the ones who stay in business will be putting up the air fares to recover these crazy claims.”

He said Ryanair had paid out to everyone affected by the volcano eruption, including Ms McDonagh, adding: “The ­compensation culture is running riot.”

Consumer group Which? Has said there is no need to put up airline prices because of the new legal ruling.

A spokesperson said: “Airlines already account for compensation in their ticket costs, so there should be no reason for any airline to increase their prices as a result.”